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How to Manage Threatening Situations with Customers

October 13, 2021 | Author: Employsure

Running your business in a world where vaccination status has become a divisive issue certainly isn’t easy. You may...

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July 29, 2021 | Author: Employsure Face2Face

It is no secret that the year 2020 impacted the lives of people across the globe. Locally in Australia...

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The race that stops a nation on Tuesday 5 November 2019, the Melbourne Cup, will present multiple distributions and complications for employers dealing with the impact on their workforce.

Loss of Productivity.

If you live or work in Victoria, the good news, is Melbourne Cup day is considered a public holiday.

For the other ‘unlucky’ States and Territories, the celebration is simply another ordinary working day. However, the ‘race that stops the nation’ naturally halts many workplaces, where varying degrees of celebration and festivities are a common part of workplace culture.

While many workplaces will pause for the race, some employers might argue that the loss in productivity is detrimental to the overall business and disruption to clients may look unprofessional. However, Isabella Zamorano a Senior Employment Relations Adviser at Employsure says there are some benefits of allowing employees to take the afternoon off to celebrate the festivities.

“By allowing employees time away from work to attend events like a Melbourne Cup lunch, teams will benefit from bonding time together outside work, getting to know each other in a more casual environment. Social events can encourage staff to stay in their jobs longer.”

Ms Zamorano adds, “We know that by offering additional benefits such as time off work for events, your employees might speak more favourably about working at your business to others thus providing positive exposure for your business.”

Sickies.

For some employees, an afternoon off may not be enough time to celebrate (or recover) so they may be tempted to ‘chuck a sickie’ on the following day or extend the normal two-day weekend to four days, by taking the Monday off sick. In doing so they might be taking non-genuine leave.

Ms Zamorano says employers should ‘saddle up’ for an influx of ‘sickies,’ “The most important aspect of managing employee absences on or after Cup Day is ensuring that the rules for sick days or expectations for Cup Day are understood from the outset.”

She says, “Ensure clear policies are in place upfront and that these are communicated to staff – including those relating to work on public holidays, notice of sick leave absences and the evidence that is required to support such absences. Inform staff in advance of the sick leave policy, including the requirement that they provide a medical certificate as evidence in relation to any absences on Cup Day or the following day.”

The Fair Work Act and the National Employment Standards (NES) make it clear that employers can require notification from employees of any absence and evidence to support any personal leave they take.

When Does The Function End?

It’s not uncommon for a Melbourne Cup lunch or afternoon drink to quickly evolve into after work drinks; so, it is critical for employers to be clear with employees about the start and end times of the function. Ms Zamorano advises employers to, “Explicitly detail what times and where staff are expected to be. For example, “at 3.30 pm work resumes” or “staff may leave early after the race, but the work day ends when staff leave the office.”

“The reason this is important is because events that occur outside the work function can still be an employer’s responsibility such as workplace injuries, harassment claims and even criminal offences.”

Responsible Gambling.

While it’s generally acceptable to have a “punt” in the betting sweeps, gambling is a particularly sensitive subject for certain people. Some cultural or religious groups have prohibitions on gambling as an activity. In other cases, a person may have experience with a gambling addiction. Ms Zamorano says employers should be mindful to ensure that these people are not forced, or negatively impacted.

“You cannot force employees to participate in social festivities, nor would that be an enjoyable experience for those involved. Many businesses host betting sweeps as part of Melbourne Cup celebrations and a number of people who don’t normally gamble will participate on the day. However, employers should be mindful that some people may have genuine objections to gambling, horse racing or alcohol related events.”

Responsible Service of Alcohol.

Festivities always have an element of risk whether it be alcohol related or not. Employers have a duty of care towards employees and should not put their health or safety on the line at the event or after an event.

“Employers should be clear and transparent about their drug and alcohol policies setting out standards and expectations before, during, and after these events as well as being clear on the start and finish times of any employer run events. This will create a defined line as to when the event finished and therefore impact on the employer’s responsibilities and obligations,” she said.

Media Enquiries.
[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

Notes to Editor.

  • Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading outsourced HR solution for over 25,000 small and medium sized businesses; providing customised expert advice, documentation, and protection to manage their workplace with confidence. For more information on Employsure’s employment relations and health and safety solutions visit www.employsure.com.au
  • Interviews with Senior Employment Relations Adviser at Employsure, Isabella Zamorano are available upon request.

Today’s release of figures from the Fair Work Ombudsman and Fair Work Commission are a sign that Australia’s small businesses are caught in a web of complexity, according to Australia’s largest workplace relations company, Employsure.

The annual reports from both the Fair Work Ombudsman and Fair Work Commission, released today, show that fundamental obligations such as wage rates, pay slips and record keeping are still a common problem for business owners.

Key figures from the Fair Work Ombudsman Annual Report include:

  • More than $40 million recovered for 18,000 underpaid employees
  • More than $4.4 million secured in court-ordered penalties
  • $479,900 in on-the-spot fines issued for pay slip and record-keeping breaches
  • More than 2800 workplace audits conducted

Meanwhile, figures from the Fair Work Commission Annual Report include:

  • 13,928 Unfair Dismissal Claims lodged
  • 10,974 decisions and orders published
  • 11,702 hearings and conferences

Managing Director of Employsure Ed Mallett said the figures paint a picture of a sector struggling to meet its obligations.

“It would be wrong to assume that all of these businesses are rogue operators. Also caught up in these figures will be small business owners who are trying their best in a very difficult system,” he said.

“Employsure Advisers take thousands of calls each year from small business owners needing help. Wage rates and entitlements are always high on the list of issues they’re struggling with.

“Of course we want a system that eradicates systemic workplace relations breaches. But we also need a system that adequately supports small business owners and limits unnecessary complexity.

“We hope that the Government’s Workplace Relations System Review will address some of the issues that are making it near-impossible for the small business community to successfully navigate Australia’s workplace relations system.

“In particular we’d like to see reforms that limit vexatious unfair dismissal claims, while reducing the amount of red tape that prohibits small business growth.”

Media Enquiries.
[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

The NSW Government has unveiled a new mobile reporting system that will give workers the ability to anonymously report dangerous working conditions to the workplace healthy and safety regulator, SafeWork NSW.

The tool, called ‘Speak Up. Save Lives’, was announced by the Minister for Better Regulation and Innovation, Kevin Anderson. Anderson, via a statement, said it would “make it easy” for workers to report potentially fatal workplace  risks.

The tool, a smart application for mobile phones, will allow workers to send up to three photos to SafeWork NSW. The app will use keep the user’s location and details anonymous if they so wish.

The app is expected to go live in early 2020 and will be free of charge.

Senior Workplace Health and Safety Manager from Employsure, Larry Drewsen says, the principle of the initiative is simple: “No one should go to work and never return home.” Adding, that safety is easier when there is a collaborative effort, “From front-line workers and employees all the way to upper management, it’s essential that everybody works together to ensure every Australian worker arrives home safely and without injury after each and every shift.”

Mr Drewsen says safety is a collaborative effort: “Whether you’re a worker, an employee, employer or business owner, everyone has the right to feel safe at work. No workplace should be unsafe to work in, and injuries or fatalities should not be tolerated.”

“Whether your workplace is in the offices of the corporate headquarters city buildings, in a warehouse, in the field, on the road, or anywhere else, making sure your workplace ensures you and your team are safe when doing their job is the number one priority.”

“Lives change forever when there’s a serious injury or death in the workplace. The victims, their families, employers, co-workers, paramedics, and all those involved.”

Mr Drewsen said while the initiative was positive, he had some concerns about the effectiveness of the app.

“In principle, a forum for workers to have easy access to report issues to the regulator is a positive initiative, particularly in situations where issues are not being addressed by management,” Mr Drewsen said.

“However, my concern is that because of the ease of access, workers will be more inclined to go straight to the regulator and bypass the consultation process, thus undermining one of the key objectives of the health and safety system.”

“My real fear is that issues may not be addressed until the regulator, who is already stretched, is able to respond. The potential consequences [there will be] injuries that may have otherwise been prevented through the consultative process.”

“A focus of Employsure’s service is to assist clients in building a positive health and safety culture within the workplace, a critical factor in achieving continuous improvement in the management of health and safety.”

By sharing your knowledge, you can help prevent your workplace and co-workers from becoming a statistic:

  • Over 100,000 serious workplace injury claims are lodged in Australia every year1
  • Untreated mental health conditions cost Australian workplaces approximately $10.9 billion per year2
  • 81 per cent of Australian small businesses admit they don’t fully understand their workplace safety obligations3
  • 1 in 3 small business employers don’t know where to go to find help; admitting they rely on Google for answers4

The initiative coincides with the annual National Safety Month run by WorkSafe Australia in October to spotlight the importance of work health and safety. As the leading workplace specialists for over 25,000 small and medium businesses across Australia, Employsure encourages employers to get involved in the annual awareness event and welcomes the announcement, as a step forward to create healthier, safer and happier workplaces.

To access the tool visit Speak Up on your mobile device.

-ends-

Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

Notes to Editor.

  • Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading workplace relations specialist, helping over 25,000 small businesses to confidently manage their staff each day. For more information visit employsure.com.au
  • Interviews with Senior Workplace Health and Safety Manager at Employsure, Larry Drewsen are available upon request

Sources.

[1] https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/statistics-and-research/statistics/disease-and-injuries/disease-and-injury-statistics

[2] https://www.headsup.org.au/docs/default-source/resources/bl1270-report—tns-the-state-of-mental-health-in-australian-workplaces-hr.pdf?sfvrsn=8

[3-4] https://employsure.com.au/research/workplace-safety-index/

Israel-Folau-And-Rugby-Team-News

Collectively, the Australian Industry Group, the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and Employsure have labelled the Morrison government’s draft religious freedom laws as , ‘unworkable’, and ‘unfair.’

The draft Federal Government religious discrimination laws would make it discriminatory for a large employer with a turnover of over $50 million or more to stop their employees expressing their personal beliefs – unless they can prove it would cause financial damage to their brand. The issue has been thrust into the spotlight with the ongoing case between controversial rugby player Israel Folau and Rugby Australia.

Attorney-General Christian Porter released the draft legislation last month after consultation with religious groups, following an election pledge to protect Australians from religious discrimination. Mr Porter said the rationale for this provision on larger businesses is that it halts businesses trying to dictate what their employees say outside work hours, which he argues is a restriction on free speech.

However, business group representatives have expressed strong concerns over the application of the proposed law, it’s interpretation, and its wider implications.

The AIG group has prepared a written submission to remind the government of the legal obligations for business to prevent bullying and other behaviour which could affect mental health. “Employers also need policies to address out of hours conduct that has a sufficient connection with the workplace,” the group argued.

The draft bill was “unbalanced, unworkable and unfair upon employers”, as well as being inconsistent with existing workplace laws, the AIG said.

Senior Employment Relations Adviser at Employsure, Michael Wilkinson, echoed Mr Willox’s sentiment saying the laws would be challenging, arguing, “It will be near impossible for large businesses to satisfy the proposed exemption relating to financial hardship. Most businesses of that scale would be extremely reluctant to argue financial hardship due to the practical market and PR consequences of doing so.”

Mr Wilkinson further raised concerns about the implications and applications of the proposed religious freedom laws. For example, “If a large business implements a code of conduct restricting workers’ statements of belief, their dress, appearance or behaviour it must show that the restrictive code is necessary to prevent financial adversity. This provision does not apply to small businesses and raises questions about whether the legislation could result in such businesses being held to the same standard over time.”

Also problematic according to Mr Wilkinson is the ambiguity on key elements such as, “What is meant by religious belief or activities, but it is intended to provide protection for all expressions of religious beliefs and activities such as prayers and fasting, the commitment to wear certain garments such as head-coverings, and evangelising or seeking to persuade others to follow creed.”

The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry has put forth views that the definition of “religious belief or activity” is required to be clarified. The clarification comes forth from concerns that Indigenous spirituality may not be afforded the same legal protection as “esoteric or emerging religion, the bona fides of which are yet to be established”.

Equally, Mr Wilkinson suggested it would be necessary to have a “reasonableness” test in cases of indirect discrimination on religious grounds which should ensure complaints are not frivolous.

Expressing strong concerns that the legislation would over-ride existing state anti-discrimination laws, Mr Wilkinson said, “In effect, the proposed laws are flawed and impractical. This is just another case of unnecessary red tape – various protections exist protect employees from discrimination in the workplace and outside the workplace. Is another law really needed?” he asked.

Mr Willox also appeared to prefer ditching the laws all together, saying: “There are already comprehensive protections in place to protect religious freedoms.”

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, the government hopes to pass the laws through Parliament by the end of the year.

Media Enquiries.
[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

World Mental Health Day has begun and Employsure’s Talent Consultant Nicola Scott says it presents great chance to remind employers of the importance of managing mental health in the workplace.

Most employers, will at some point have a member of their workforce with a mental health issue. Around one person in five (20%) had experienced a mental health condition in any given year and over twice that number (45%, or nearly half the Australian population) had experienced one at some time in their lives according to the Australian Bureau of Statistics1.

“Considering full-time employees in Australia spend 38 hours per-week at work, it is important to know the best way to handle mental health within your workplace” Nicola says.

“Investing in a safe and healthy working environment makes good business sense for employers to succeed.”

Whilst everyday pressures can affect mental health and wellbeing, Nicola suggests employers should take all possible steps to control the factors within the workplace which can affect the health of employees. Simple steps to do so include promoting a positive, supportive working environment, and a culture of openness, where employees can access appropriate support.

It’s widely accepted when employee health and wellbeing is managed well, creativity and innovation increases: “We know that employees with a better mental state and healthier outlook are much more likely to be productive and engaged at work.” For that reason, “investing in workplace wellbeing is truly invaluable and can deliver substantial direct and indirect returns to organisational outcomes” adds Nicola.

Nicola says every employer should take appropriate steps to minimise health and safety risks, including mental health, within the workplace: “Encouraging mental health educational programs, training and health awareness in the workplace is a great way to ensure a supportive work environment.”

Nicola also suggests encouraging better work methods, including regular use of leave entitlements, flexible working arrangements, and monitoring employees’ workloads to reduce stress and ensure a happy and productive workforce.

“Ultimately, a business that promotes health and wellbeing isn’t just meeting their obligations under law, it is the smart thing to do as investing in their people will have a positive effect on their bottom line.”

-ends-

Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

Notes to Editor.

  • Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading workplace relations specialist, helping over 25,000 small businesses to confidently manage their staff each day. For more information visit www.employsure.com.au
  • Interviews with Senior Health and Safety Manager at Employsure, Larry Drewsen are available upon request.

Sources

[1] https://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/docs/default-source/factsheets/facts_figures.pdf?sfvrsn=8

Announced today, Employsure is bringing BrightHR, a cloud-based HR software service, to the fingertips of thousands of small and medium businesses across Australia and New Zealand (ANZ).

Establishing in the ANZ market as a new service offered exclusively by Employsure, BrightHR is a HR support software that helps small business employers streamline employee data collection, storage and management. It is web-based and is available as a mobile app, empowering users to maintain and act on requests easily anywhere. At time of launch, the award-winning HR software already has over 600 ANZ businesses registered with access to the software and more than 27,000 globally.

The BrightHR service is the latest addition to Employsure’s unique suite of services designed to make the complex simple for small and medium business employers – improving their operational HR management, people performance, and giving them access to the tools and advice they need to confidently manage their business.

Employsure’s Managing Director Ed Mallett says Employsure is about: “Empowering businesses, helping them to understand what systems and practices they need to have in place to meet their obligations.” Mr Mallett says the BrightHR service aligns perfectly with Employsure’s key vision to make managing employees easy for small businesses owners and start-ups: “In a world powered by cloud-based apps, we’re bringing innovative solutions to small businesses  to save them time, help them comply, build in structure and efficiencies, and give them a tool that can be used daily by every member of their growing business. Most importantly, BrightHR seamlessly compliments existing components of the Employsure experience.”

BrightHR’s CEO, Alan Price said: “With demand across the globe for our product increasing fast, I’m delighted that we’re able to help Australia and New Zealand’s diverse and highly skilled small business community tap into the benefits of our cloud-based HR software. Whether businesses are using our software on their laptop, tablet or mobile, BrightHR will save employers time, money and effort.”

BrightHR users can record, monitor and manage employees’ absences, annual leave requests, rosters and shifts in a single place. It also has a feature for workforce scheduling that allows employers to quickly assign and share these working schedules to the team. With the software being accessible through the cloud and its mobile app, time-off requests and approvals are easily accessed by employees and managed by employers making record management and people management simple.

BrightHR capabilities and benefits in a snapshot:

  • Record and monitor staff absence in one central place
  • Store medical certificates and other related documents
  • Stay compliant with a comprehensive audit trail
  • Create digital rosters in seconds for individual employees and the team
  • Track and record employees’ hours of work
  • Notify employees in real-time about upcoming roster schedules
  • Always ensure there are enough staff to cover shifts
  • Manage employee business expenses
  • iOS and Android app capabilities including real-time notifications for employers and employees

Employsure is offering free BrightHR demos and invites businesses across ANZ to try out a new and more efficient way to handle their people management responsibilities.

-ends-

Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

About Employsure.

Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading outsourced HR solution for over 25,000 small and medium sized businesses; providing customised expert advice, documentation, and protection to manage their workplace with confidence. For more information on Employsure’s employment relations and health and safety solutions visit www.employsure.com.au

About BrightHR.

BrightHR is an international HR software and support service. Their cloud-based software offers users single place to record their employees’ absences, respond to annual leave requests and make shifts and rosters. For more about BrightHR visit www.employsure.com.au/what-we-offer/bright-hr-software/ 

National Safe Work Month 2016

Observed annually in October, National Safety Month is an initiative run by Safe Work Australia to spotlight the importance of work health and safety. As the leading workplace specialists for over 25,000 small and medium businesses across Australia, Employsure encourages employers to get involved in the annual awareness event by stepping up efforts to create healthier, safer and happier workplaces.

Senior Health and Safety Manager from Employsure, Larry Drewsen says, it’s really that simple: “No one should go to work and never return home.” Adding, that safety is easier when there is a collaborative effort, “From front-line workers and employees all the way to upper management, it’s essential that everybody works together to ensure every Australian worker arrives home safely and without injury after each and every shift.”

“Safe work awareness shouldn’t be isolated to the month of October – it’s a commitment to be taken very seriously every single day, 365 days a year.”

“Whether your workplace is in the offices of the corporate headquarters city buildings, in a warehouse, in the field, on the road, or anywhere else, making sure your workplace ensures you and your team are safe when doing their job is the number one priority.”

“Lives change forever when there’s a serious injury or death in the workplace. The victims, their families, employers, co-workers, paramedics, and all those involved.”

Mr Drewsen says safety is a collaborative effort: “Whether you’re a worker, an employee, employer or business owner, everyone has the right to feel safe at work. No workplace should be unsafe to work in, and injuries or fatalities should not be tolerated.”

By sharing your knowledge, you can help prevent your workplace and co-workers from becoming a statistic:

  • Over 100,000 serious workplace injury claims are lodged in Australia every year1
  • Untreated mental health conditions cost Australian workplaces approximately $10.9 billion per year2
  • 81 per cent of Australian small businesses admit they don’t fully understand their workplace safety obligations3
  • 1 in 3 small business employers don’t know where to go to find help; admitting they rely on Google for answers4

What can your business do during Health and Safety Month?

“Safety in the workplace along with the regulations is tricky to manage but there is no room for second guessing. You have to get it right the first time. Unsafe workplaces cost lives.”

“Throughout this month we’ll be sharing helpful tips on how you can make your workplace safer, shed light on the common hazards and safety mistakes so you can mitigate, and avoid them, give you informative infographics to download, including videos and many more helpful resources you can use to take part in the National Safe Work Month this October.”

 

Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

 

Notes to Editor.

  • Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading workplace relations specialist, helping over 25,000 small businesses to confidently manage their staff each day. For more information visit www.employsure.com.au
  • Interviews with Senior Health and Safety Manager at Employsure, Larry Drewsen are available upon request.

Sources.

[1] https://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/statistics-and-research/statistics/disease-and-injuries/disease-and-injury-statistics
[2] https://www.headsup.org.au/docs/default-source/resources/bl1270-report—tns-the-state-of-mental-health-in-australian-workplaces-hr.pdf?sfvrsn=8
[3-4] https://employsure.com.au/research/workplace-safety-index/

 

 

The Fair Work Commission have released recent data revealing enterprise agreement (EA) approvals have reduced significantly.

Over the past six months to August, the data shows the median time for approving EAs has more than halved from its peak of 76 days to 35 days. Data also revealed the queue to have an agreement approved had fallen from a peak of 2,063 in January to just 660 in early August.

However, Employsure’s managing director, Ed Mallett, said the decline in enterprise bargaining timeframes were the not entirely due to ‘process efficiencies’ but, also the demonstration that, “employers are abandoning enterprise bargaining altogether, because the process is far too complex to navigate,” he said.

Mr Mallett said employers lacked confidence in the process due to complications and uncertainties of the system: “A key reason for the recent decline in enterprise agreements has been the lack of discretion that the Fair Work Commission has had to approve enterprise agreements when very minor procedural or technical errors have been made by one or more of the parties. As a result, employers don’t have confidence in the resource-intensive system that has a history of failing to deliver real productivity as intended.”

Mr Mallett points to historical examples of Fair Work Commission decisions that have triggered the demise of enterprise bargaining such as expired agreements at Coles, Woolworths and other retail giants causing many employers to reconsider the viability of EAs.

“These are cases and issues demonstrating how the bargaining process has become a ‘minefield.’ As a result, many employers are deciding that the enterprise bargaining system is just too much trouble to bother with.”

Last year, only 65 per cent of agreements requiring undertakings passed the BOOT test threshold and in 2016, that figure was just 35 per cent.

Mr Mallett welcomed industrial relations minister Christian Porter’s promise to, explore improvements in timelines to make the system simpler and less resource-intensive, as part of his review of key industrial relations issues.

“We are in full support of examining the current enterprise bargaining system in Minister Porter’s upcoming reviews of poor performing elements of Australia’s industrial relations system. We need employers and employees to be able to negotiate their relationship terms in a productive and constructive way,” said Mr Mallett.

-ends-

Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

Notes to Editor.

  • Employsure is Australia and New Zealand’s leading workplace relations specialist, helping over 25,000 small businesses to confidently manage their staff each day. For more information visit www.employsure.com.au
  • Interviews with Ed Mallett, founder and managing director of Employsure are available upon request.

As a result of continued business growth, Employsure has opened a new major office in Brisbane.

The new office space at 180 Ann Street, Brisbane City comes complete with uniquely Brisbane features, including light-filled meeting rooms and spacious workspaces.

The office was officially opened last month by Employsure managing director Ed Mallett and celebrated with an official office opening party.

Employsure has grown quickly across the country in the last eight years, beginning with a team of two and now currently sitting at 700+ staff across Australia and New Zealand.

Head of Talent at Employsure, Michael Morris says, “The new Brisbane office space demonstrates our long-term commitment to businesses in regional and urban areas across the Eastern Seaboard who require specialist workplace relations advice.”

“At Employsure, we believe that successfully addressing client needs requires more than just knowledge of the law and a mastery of the multitude of rules and regulations that impact our clients’ interests. Our commitment to excellence, combined with our mission to deliver outstanding client service, has allowed Employsure to be the leaders in small business workplace advice,” he said.

Employsure’s Property Manager, Maureen Croft says, “Employsure’s investment in a permanent home in Brisbane is a real win for our employees and clients. The opportunity to design a space that aligns with our values and our ‘client is king’ mentality has been incredibly rewarding. We are seeing increased collaboration, higher engagement and most importantly, an exceptional service being delivered to our clients 24/7.”

“With the business growth and an increase in workforce, we look forward to continuing working together with companies and candidates alike, creating more dynamic and rewarding working relationships and “enabling success for all.”

The new Brisbane office offers a range of features:

  • open plan activity-based seating for increased collaboration
  • an assortment of new meeting rooms, designed to encourage focus and collaborative work
  • state-of-the art technology and AV including video conferencing
  • ​a trendy, break-out/kitchen area
  • custom designed flexible space that caters to events, meetings and training

-ends-
Media Enquires.

[email protected]
tel: 1300 651 415

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